Pupil Premium

Pupil Premium Statement 2016-17

The Pupil Premium Grant is an amount of money the government allocates to each school, to support all pupils to reach their potential. It should be used to “help schools narrow the attainment gap that still exists between pupils from disadvantaged and more affluent backgrounds”.

At Park View School 81% of students are eligible for the Pupil Premium, this is well above the national average of 27%.  Park View’s projected allocation for 2016/17 is £35,445.

Activity / Strategy / Intervention

The allocation will be spent as follows:

Breakfast Club

£1100

Support

1:1 Literacy and Numeracy Interventions provided by subject specialist – £850

Friday

PVS Friday Rewards Programme – £7800

Staff Training

SMSC/Quality Feedback – £25000

Trips

Subsidising student residential trips – £1750

Placements

Work based learning placements for students  – £3000

Expenditure

£35500

Allocation

£35455

Evaluation

Those elements identified above which will have a clear impact upon academic progress have a plan with clear success criteria, outlined below. These will be evaluated at the end of the year to ensure the funds have been used effectively. These findings will be presented to the governing body. The other elements are enrichment programmes aimed and improving social skills, social awareness and emotional health. These are important factors in this type of setting but are harder to measure.

Breakfast Club
Research has demonstrated that learning and knowledge acquisition is more effective if a student is sufficiently nourished. “Those children who regularly eat breakfast are more likely to have higher school grades. Those children who skip breakfast have more difficulty focusing on classroom tasks and concentrating in class, which is apparent in both well and undernourished children and children from deprived backgrounds. This has implications for school performance” (Adolphus et al, 2013).

Therefore giving students a good start to the day is imperative to ensuring teaching and learning is effective during the morning session.

Evaluation question:
Does providing students with breakfast free of charge reduce the number of out of class incidents during lessons 1 & 2?

Pre-test measures:
Out of class data.

Implementation:
Breakfast is available (toast, cereal, hot drinks) every morning between 8.30am and 9.00am from the 1st of September 2015.

Measuring the Impact
An analysis will be carried out of the out of class data for lessons 1 & 2 gathered prior to the start of the breakfast club compared to the data produced after the club started.

Support

Supporting 1:1 Literacy and Numeracy with new 5A’s assessment system:
“The key elements of effective teaching approaches for low attainers in literacy include: early intervention, one to one and/or small group support and personalisation” (Brooks, 2002).

Improved accuracy in assessment will provide more valuable, incisive information. This will allow staff in Maths and English to target effective interventions in those subjects.

Evaluative Question:
Do progress rates improve in Maths and English following 1:1 interventions in those subject areas?

Pre-test measures: Pre-intervention progress rates

Implementation
Interventions now happen daily for Maths and English for all students. They are timetabled sessions delivered to small groups.

PVS Fridays

PVS Fridays
A new behaviour reward system has been introduced that awards points for attitude to learning, behaviour and progress, the students are then placed in a league table based upon the points they receive. A programme of non-academic activities will be offered to the top 6 -10 students every Friday.

Evaluation question: Has the PVS Friday behaviour tool yielded a net improvement in the average score for individual groups and the whole school over the academic year?

Implementation
All staff will be expected to enter data into the behaviour tool after each lesson reflecting a student’s engagement, behaviour and attendance to that lesson. The tool will be analysed by SLT on Thursday evenings and students made aware of the outcome prior to the commencement of the reward every Friday.

Analysis and Impact
The monthly average points score for year/class groups and whole school will increase across the academic year.

Staff

Female PE member of staff (HLTA)
Female engagement in PE has been an area of increasing concern over recent years. Our female student cohort has grown to its highest ever level, currently 19% (Jan, 2017). It has previously been challenging to engage female students within a predominantly male student cohort, led by male staff. It is anticipated that a female member of staff, running female only groups,  will increase engagement, improve outcomes and improve the well-being of the female cohort.

Activities

Subsiding residential Activities
Residential activities happen throughout the academic year and comprise of sight-seeing trips to London, skiing in Scotland and Outdoor Education residential in the Lake District. The trips are used to reward those students with good attendance and behaviour.

Evaluative Question:
Does subsidising residential activities of disadvantaged students? 

Those who attend the residential placements should have demonstrated a significant improvement in attendance over the year. Those with attendance below 85% will have improved their attendance by 10% over the course of the year.

Pre-test measures

Attendance data

Implementation
Students are made aware of all trips early in the year and it is explained them that their ability to attend such trips will be based upon their behaviour and attendance.

Work Based - Placements

Work Based Learning Placements
A small proportion of the student cohort will be targeted with an offer of a 1 or 2 day work-based learning placement. These placements are hosted by quality assured training providers who offer accredited outcomes over a range of subjects. They are largely vocational subjects that we do not have the facilities to offer as a school. They types of students targeted are those with poor attendance (particularly at Key stage 4), those who have not attended at their previous provision for an extended period or cannot cope with a full, school based timetable.

Evaluation Question: Will the attendance of those students enrolled on work-based placements improve?

Implementation
Suitable placements will be identified based upon student interviews, discussions with parents/carers and individual students’ academic ability. A timetable will then be agreed and an appropriate member of staff to support the student in the work place will be identified.

Analysis and Impact
Students enrolled upon work-based learning programmes will exhibit 85%+ attendance on those days and demonstrate a 20% increase in attendance overall.

Pupil Premium Statement 2015-16

The Pupil Premium Grant is an amount of money the government allocates to each school, to support all pupils to reach their potential. It should be used to “help schools narrow the attainment gap that still exists between pupils from disadvantaged and more affluent backgrounds”. At Park View School 81% of students were eligible for the Pupil Premium last year, this is well above the national average of 27%.  Park View’s allocation for 2015/16 is £34,745.

Activity / Strategy / Intervention

The allocation will be spent as follows:

Breakfast Club

£720

Support

1:1 Literacy and Numeracy Interventions provided by subject specialist – £18120

Data

New Data Tracking System – £3485

Friday

PVS Friday Rewards Programme – £7800

Staff Training

SMSC/Quality Feedback – £1500

Trips

Subsidising student residential trips – £1720

Placements

Work based learning placements for students  – £4000

Expenditure

£37345

Allocation

£34745

Evaluation

Those elements identified above which will have a clear impact upon academic progress have a plan with clear success criteria, outlined below. These will be evaluated at the end of the year to ensure the funds have been used effectively. These findings will be presented to the governing body. The other elements are enrichment programmes aimed and improving social skills, social awareness and emotional health. These are important factors in this type of setting but are harder to measure.

Impact of strategy / Breakfast Club

Out of class data for lessons 1 and 2 showed a decline in incidents of out of class behaviour by 24%. No Serious behaviour incidents were recorded during lesson 1 and 2 during 2015/16.

Supporting 1:1 Literacy and Numeracy Interventions provided by subject specialist.

Spring Term focus for year 11 intervention was functional skills, 100% now have functional skills L1.  11 students who are not in year 11 receiving intervention 55% made at least 1 sub level of progress and were put back on track.  5A’s continues to be used effectively to identify gaps and target individual students.

Over the Summer term 14 students received intervention in maths, English or both.  86% of these students made 1 sub level or more progress and 64% met their end of year target.  Quality assurance showed that 100% of books contained target sheets but that these sometimes were not well annotated.  The system has been developed for September 2016 to enable this process to be more robust.

New Data Tracking

The system is now embedded in school and compliments a new school based tracker devised by the Deputy Head to ensure staff have access to good-quality, moderated assessment data.

PVS Fridays

  • PVS Fridays 1st year of incentive tool in place, majority of students buying in.
  • Pastoral Team established : (BB,CRam) lead on, monitor & analyse behaviour, producing termly action reports
  • Interventions: Hot spots and top ‘offenders’ picked up half termly and interventions put in place.
  • Behaviour Incidents: Continue to fall, 65% reduction in Spring Term when compared with autumn.
  • Mentoring:  All Students are assigned a mentor during Admission. Mentor keeps in contact weekly with parent/carer and is the first point of contact for the student.

Staff Training

2 workshops have been held during Autumn 1 – high quality feedback and expectation within the classroom.  An external CPD day was delivered 9.11.15 looking at SMSC/MDB and effective feedback. Quality assurance of files/books/5A was carried out 5.11.15. Quality assurance revealed flaws in planning proforma, following staff consultation a new format has been devised and is now in place.  Following external training evidence of SMSC links were strong features in 100% of lessons observed.

Spring 1 quality assurance found 100% of teachers now using the new planning proforma but the level of detail/content varied.  Whole school CPD and exemplar session delivered by EP on 9.2.16.  Staff were given deadlines to implement/improve and further quality assurance carried out in the form of drops in’s and during lesson observations. 100% now including cross curricular links and SMSC, differentiation evident but not clear in books.

Learning Placements

6 Students attended work-based learning placements ranging from Equine Care to Construction Skills. Unfortunately the majority of students were not able to sustain the placements. It was felt that this was largely due to the lack of training staff based at these placements had with the needs of our students. This has been highlighted as a future development point.

The student that attended a placement at the stables achieved a Level 1 Certificate in Equine Care and showed a 12% improvement in attendance when compared to the period prior to the placement starting.

You can find the 15/16 full report here